CDN Cache Control Headers: Take Hold of the Cache

CDN Cache Control Headers

The cache control Etag (or entity tag) is an HTTP header that’s included in a request message sent to servers. The cache control Etag is included in the message that requests for data to particularly mention if this user has requested for data before or not. By including a cache control Etag in the request message, the server will be informed whether to give data that has already been sent, or freshly generated data, as part of cache control best practices.

CDN cache control headers are versions of cache control Etags that work better with CDNs, in hopes to perform cache control best practices. Through the CDN cache control headers, the cache control Etag is used to identify whether the CDN will pull new data from the source or will use data that previously cached. This way, the CDN will not only keep on sending data as requested but will stay keen in deciding whether what is needed is new data, same old data, or whether to send data at all. By developing better cache control Etags, cache control best practices are supported. Using CDN cache control headers do more than just improve the exchange of data between the CDN and the users. CDN cache control headers also promote better data control, and even improve online security for your company website and the customers that access it. If you want to infuse cache control best practices into your CDNs, understanding cache control Etags and CDN cache control headers will give you a leg up in the content delivery network game. While all of these sounds complicated, a basic understanding of cache control Etags and CDN cache control headers will be beneficial, as part of cache control best practices.

Managing the Exchange of Data

Cache control isn’t a simple process of sending data. Cache control best practices include a lot of other aspects that make up CDN processes, like origin pulling, cache purging, and time to live. There is also an added layer of getting to know who requests data, what data is being given away, and how the cache behaves. CDN cache control headers can aid in managing the queue, and the usages of caching. By using specified cache control Etags that are directed to the CDN, the CDN will get to know who is the requesting party, and what kind of data is being requested. Cache control best practices entail a thorough understanding of data requests and exchanges that happen being the multitude of website visitors, or server visitors. Part of cache control best practices is sending data that is relevant to the time it was requested. For example, cache control best practices for live streaming will entail the use of cache control Etags that indicate that data being requested is for an ongoing live stream of a certain web event. If the cache control Etag is a mere request, the server will only send what’s in the queue. Chances are, this data is no longer updated, and what is sent to the user are video data that show events that already happened minutes ago, making the live stream lag, or not live at all. This is an example of how cache control best practices were not used, and a CDN cache control header could have remedied this. If the server request included a CDN cache control header, the CDN would have refreshed the queue instead, pulled data from the server that is closer to the live event’s current happenings, and sent data that is fresh and more current. This is putting cache control best practices into good use. The cache control Etag is elevated, and the CDN cache control header is used adequately.

Security Measures

Using CDN cache control headers instead of mere cache control Etags are also part of cache control best practices for security. By putting CDN cache control headers in place of the regular cache control Etag, the CDN gets to know these users better. Malware, hackers, and viruses that try to access the website are also identified because of their uncanny cache control Etags, or lack thereof. As the CDN is looking for specific CDN cache control headers, and find out there are none, the CDN can alert its defenses and not grant the requestors any data at all. Also, the CDN’s firewall can be activated, so that these vile forces can be identified and removed from the server. CDN cache control headers are indeed part of security cache control best practices, something that mere cache control Etags can’t do.

Want to know more to CDN cache control headers, and other cache control best practices? Talk to us here at BelugaCDN right now.

Power-up your Content Delivery
30 Day Free Trial Cancel Anytime

Get A Free Trial!